TITLE

THE BILL OF RIGHTS: THE FIRST TEN AMENDMENDTS

PUB. DATE
January 2002
SOURCE
World Almanac for Kids;2002, p243
SOURCE TYPE
Almanac
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
The first ten amendments were adopted in 1791 and contain the basic freedoms Americans enjoy as a people. These amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. The first amendment guarantees freedom of religion, speech, and the press. The second amendment guarantees the right of the people to have firearms. The third guarantees that soldiers cannot be lodged in private homes unless the owner agrees. The fourth protects citizens against being searched or having their property searched or taken away by the government without a good reason. The fifth protects rights of people on trial for crimes. The sixth guarantees people accused of crimes the right to a speedy public trial by jury. The seventh guarantees people the right to a trial by jury for other kinds of cases. The eighth prohibits "cruel and unusual punishments". The ninth says that specific rights listed in the Constitution do not take away rights that may not be listed. The tenth establishes that any powers not given specifically to the federal government belong to states or the people.
ACCESSION #
8540196

 

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