TITLE

SATELLITE

AUTHOR(S)
Lewis, James R.
PUB. DATE
March 2003
SOURCE
Astrology Book;2003, p596
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
An encyclopedia entry for "satellite" is presented. It refers to any body that orbits another body. Primary is used to refer to the body being orbited. The most common examples of satellites, include the moon, a satellite of earth and the earth, which is a satellite of the sun. The term was traditionally to label the attendants of important people.
ACCESSION #
36184827

 

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