TITLE

60 BCE

PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
History of Science & Technology;2004, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
The article provides information on a form of newspaper invented by Julius Caesar in 60 BCE.
ACCESSION #
19522533

 

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