TITLE

The Implementation of Different Decision Making Structures In Adapting To Environmental Uncertainty

AUTHOR(S)
Duncan, Robert B.
PUB. DATE
August 1971
SOURCE
Academy of Management Proceedings (00650668);1971, p39
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Proceeding
ABSTRACT
The data presented above thus indicate that there are differences in the way decision units organize themselves for making routine and nonroutine decisions under different conditions of perceived uncertainty and perceived influence over the environment in decision making. This research thus confirms the contingency theories of organization, Argyris [28], Lawrence and Lorsch [29], Pugh ET AL [30], that indicate that there are different types of organizational structures appropriate for different types of situations. However, this research goes beyond the contingency theories in showing that the SAME decision unit implemented different organizational structures and that was related to the decision unit's effectiveness.
ACCESSION #
4980830

 

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