TITLE

Identifying animal illusions requires neuronal and cognitive approaches: comment on Kelley and Kelley

AUTHOR(S)
Théry, Marc
PUB. DATE
May 2014
SOURCE
Behavioral Ecology;May2014, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p465
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The author comments on the article "Animal visual illusion and confusion: the importance of a perceptual perspective," by L. A. Kelley et al. The study authors offer a highly original and stimulating review, specifically interesting when speaking about animal illusion. This idea is rarely mentioned in the recent literature, with the exception of studies of forced perspective in Great Bowerbirds by John Endler et al.
ACCESSION #
99749862

 

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