TITLE

The world's deadliest animal

AUTHOR(S)
Kamerow, Douglas
PUB. DATE
May 2014
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal;5/17/2014, Vol. 348 Issue 7958, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The author discusses the status of the mosquito as the deadliest animal in the world for its role in the deaths of between 700,000 and 2.5 millions people a year. Topics addressed include the number of deaths annually from malaria, their transmission of yellow fever, and arboviral encephalitides and dengue fever transmissions. Also mentioned are cases of West Nile virus infections in the U.S. in 2013, the spread of chikungunya virus infections, and recommended mosquito control activities.
ACCESSION #
96060860

 

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