TITLE

The price of inactivity

AUTHOR(S)
Darzi, Lord; Exeter, Christopher
PUB. DATE
July 2013
SOURCE
Public Finance;Jul/Aug2013, Issue 7/8, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The authors discuss aspects of preventive health care in Great Britain. They mention that its risks are shunted to the bottom whenever fiscal austerity occurs. They note changes in global health trends which involves high living standards, life expectancy growth and a decline in child mortality along with rapid globalisation and technological innovations. They also point out the risk of preventable illnesses to human life leading the need for a medical policy shift to early intervention.
ACCESSION #
88067630

 

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