TITLE

Life after stop-and-frisk... really

AUTHOR(S)
CLAXTON, MARQ
PUB. DATE
May 2013
SOURCE
New York Amsterdam News;5/9/2013, Vol. 104 Issue 19, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's opinion on the stop-and-frisk program of the New York City Police Department (NYPD). According to the author, the current stop-and-frisk program is hardly compliant with the landmark 1968 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Terry v. Ohio, which addresses in detailed language justification for a police officer stopping and/or searching people. The author refers to NYPD's own data which shows that they are wrong about suspected criminality 80-90 percent of the time.
ACCESSION #
87638439

 

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