TITLE

Excess Equipment: An Embarrassment of Riches

AUTHOR(S)
Danford, David N.
PUB. DATE
July 2010
SOURCE
Army Sustainment;Jul2010, Vol. 42 Issue 4, p48
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
In this article the author comments on the impact of excess military equipment on military operations in the U.S. The author mentions that excess equipment manifest wastage, fraud, abuse, and irresponsibility of company commanders to assess the problem and to withdraw them from the mission. To address the problem, he suggests that the Department of the Army (DA) should impose mobile redistribution team (MRT) who will determine and will recommend equipment cuts to the brigade commander.
ACCESSION #
52411701

 

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