TITLE

A CHARACTER REVERSAL IN CHAUCER'S 'KNIGHT'S TALE'

AUTHOR(S)
Vann, J. Don
PUB. DATE
May 1965
SOURCE
American Notes & Queries;May65, Vol. 3 Issue 9, p131
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
Examines the novel 'Knight's Tale,' by Geoffrey Chaucer. Information on the character of Arcite; background on the character of Palamon; Discussion of the reversal of the character of Arcite and Palamon.
ACCESSION #
7604324

 

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