TITLE

Goon Shows, Ragtime, and the Blues: RACE, URBAN CULTURE, AND THE NATURALIST VISION IN PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR'S THE SPORT OF THE GODS

AUTHOR(S)
Von Rosk, Nancy
PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalis;2003, p144
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the naturalist visions depicted in Paul Laurence Dunbar's "The Sport of the Gods." It claims that the naturalism found in the novel is a qualitative change from Dunbar's past compositions. The novel is likewise stated to convey a racial dimension, which has been less dealt by literary naturalists. Moreover, "The Sport of the Gods" is considered an important literary work in American naturalism.
ACCESSION #
23544990

 

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