TITLE

Climate change links fate of glaciers and an endemic alpine invertebrate

AUTHOR(S)
Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Giersch, J. Joseph; Hauer, F. Richard; Pederson, Gregory T.; Luikart, Gordon; Peterson, Douglas P.; Downs, Christopher C.; Fagre, Daniel B.
PUB. DATE
May 2011
SOURCE
Climatic Change;May2011, Vol. 106 Issue 2, p337
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Letter
ABSTRACT
Climate warming in the mid- to high-latitudes and high-elevation mountainous regions is occurring more rapidly than anywhere else on Earth, causing extensive loss of glaciers and snowpack. However, little is known about the effects of climate change on alpine stream biota, especially invertebrates. Here, we show a strong linkage between regional climate change and the fundamental niche of a rare aquatic invertebrate-the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana-endemic to Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, Canada and USA. L. tumana has been petitioned for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act due to climate-change-induced glacier loss, yet little is known on specifically how climate impacts may threaten this rare species and many other enigmatic alpine aquatic species worldwide. During 14 years of research, we documented that L. tumana inhabits a narrow distribution, restricted to short sections (~500 m) of cold, alpine streams directly below glaciers, permanent snowfields, and springs. Our simulation models suggest that climate change threatens the potential future distribution of these sensitive habitats and the persistence of L. tumana through the loss of glaciers and snowfields. Mountaintop aquatic invertebrates are ideal early warning indicators of climate warming in mountain ecosystems. Research on alpine invertebrates is urgently needed to avoid extinctions and ecosystem change.
ACCESSION #
59984580

 

Related Articles

  • Climate Change to Overpower Future Pauses in Warming.  // Australasian Science;Dec2014, Vol. 35 Issue 10, p9 

    The article discusses a research study published in "Geophysical Research Letters" which suggests that climate change could overpower future pauses in the warming of global average air temperatures. Research findings presented reveal the potential disappearance of hiatuses after 2030 until the...

  • New data on current changes in the mountain glaciers of Russia. Kotlyakov, V.; Khromova, T.; Nosenko, G.; Popova, V.; Chernova, L.; Murav'ev, A. // Doklady Earth Sciences;Oct2015, Vol. 464 Issue 2, p1094 

    Based on systematic surveys and analysis of the satellite images under the GLIMS international project, the rate of glacier shrinkage and the increase in this rate for the past 15 years are estimated.

  • Listings under ESA to heat up. Rutherford, Burt // Southwest Farm Press;11/3/2011, Vol. 38 Issue 21, p22 

    The article reports on the issue pertaining to the economic impact of endangered species listings under the U.S. Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) in which Texas Comptroller Susan Combs has examined.

  • 1998 warmest year of millennium, climate researchers report.  // Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society;May99, Vol. 80 Issue 5, p952 

    Reveals that 1998 is the warmest year of the millennium, as reported by climate researchers. Examination of natural archives; Occurrence of significant changes in the climate; Consistency of the trend with the astronomical theory of climate change; Abruptness of recent warming as a potential...

  • Head of climate group rejects claims of political influence. Masood, Ehsan // Nature;6/6/1996, Vol. 381 Issue 6582, p455 

    Denies political pressure on scientists at the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to arrive at a consensus on global warming. Controversy over the accuracy of IPCC's report on climate change; Calls for measures to minimize political intervention in scientific programs.

  • Wired Up. Cudmore, Becca // Audubon;Sep2015, Vol. 117 Issue 5, p17 

    The article focuses on arboreal surveillance being conducted by researchers at Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts aimed at understanding climate change and global warming.

  • Letters to the Editor. Ruff, John; McCrum, Sue // High Plains Journal;5/5/2014, Vol. 132 Issue 18, p4B 

    Several letters to the editor are presented such as one on the rent payment for agricultural land and one concerning the dangerous overreach of the Endangered Species Act.

  • Sage grouse stays off endangered species list.  // High Plains Journal;11/2/2015, Vol. 133 Issue 45, p7A 

    The article discusses U.S. government's decision for not listing the greater sage grouse under the Endangered Species Act along with implementation of restrictive land-use plans, and the opposition against the decisions on the grounds of impediment to range management and conservation initiatives.

  • A rose by any other name ...?: What members of the general public prefer to call 'climate change'. Akerlof, Karen; Maibach, Edward W. // Climatic Change;Jun2011, Vol. 106 Issue 4, p699 

    Unlike many other environmental problems, the terms used to describe the phenomenon of increasing atmospheric concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases are many, with multiple and sometimes conflicting meanings. Whether there are meaningful distinctions in public perceptions of 'global...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics