TITLE

GEORGIA, PETITIONER v. SCOTT FITZ RANDOLPH: ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF GEORGIA

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Law
DOC. TYPE
Legal Material
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the U.S. Supreme Court case Georgia v. Randolph, case number 04-1067, argued on November 8, 2005 and decided on March 22, 2006. The dispute between petitioner Scott Randolph and his wife Janet Randolph is presented in the case in the context of the Fourth Amendment Law. The Supreme Court's affirmation and interpretation of occupant's right to permit or refuse entry in his residence are discussed.
ACCESSION #
26188031

 

Related Articles

  • GEORGIA v. RANDOLPH: CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF GEORGIA.  // Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1 

    The article presents information on the U.S. Supreme Court case Georgia v. Randolph, case number 04-1067, argued on November 8, 2005 and decided on March 22, 2006. The validity of consent given by one occupant in his residence for search or entry of the police is reviewed by the Supreme Court....

  • THE HOME AS THEIR CASTLE: AN ANALYSIS OF GEORGIA V. RANDOLPH'S IMPLICATIONS FOR DOMESTIC DISPUTES. Rasch-Chabot, Meagan // Harvard Journal of Law & Gender;Summer2007, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p507 

    This article presents an analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court decision on the case Georgia versus Randolph. At the center of the decision is the conflict between a desire to safeguard law enforcement's ability to effectively protect victims of domestic violence who share a home with their abusers...

  • GEORGIA, PETITIONER v. SCOTT FITZ RANDOLPH: ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF GEORGIA.  // Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1 

    The article presents information on the U.S. Supreme Court case, Georgia v. Randolph, case number 04-1067, argued on November 8, 2005 and decided on March 22, 2006. The case discussed the occupant's right to refuse entry of any government agent in his residence without a valid warrant. The right...

  • GEORGIA, PETITIONER v. SCOTT FITZ RANDOLPH: ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF GEORGIA.  // Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1 

    The article presents information on the U.S. Supreme Court case Georgia v. Randolph, case number 04-1067, argued on November 8, 2005 and decided on March 22, 2006. The objection made by co-occupant to restrict entry of officer was justified by the Supreme Court. The circumstances of the case...

  • GEORGIA, PETITIONER v. SCOTT FITZ RANDOLPH: ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF GEORGIA.  // Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1 

    The article presents information on the U.S. Supreme Court case, Georgia v. Randolph, case number 04-1067, argued on November 8, 2005 and decided on March 22, 2006. In the case, a dispute between petitioner Scott Randolph and his wife Janet Randolph was discussed in the context of the Fourth...

  • GEORGIA, PETITIONER v. SCOTT FITZ RANDOLPH: ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF GEORGIA.  // Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1 

    The article presents the author's opinion on justice's decision in the U.S. Supreme Court case "Georgia v. Scott Fitz Randolph." The author dissents that it is not clear to him as it is to the justice, that at the time the Fourth Amendment was adopted, a police officer could enter a married...

  • Third Party Consent Searches Following the Search and Surveillance Act. McMullan, Sam // Victoria University of Wellington Law Review;Oct2012, Vol. 43 Issue 3, p447 

    Many New Zealanders live in shared living arrangements. The result of this is that reasonable expectations of privacy are becoming more limited. State officials may conduct a lawful search where a person consents to such a search if that person has the authority to consent. Where people live in...

  • Supreme Court Rules On Warrantless Searches. EDABURN, PATRICK // Moderate Voice;2/26/2014, p8 

    In this article, the author focuses on the U.S. Supreme Court rules on warrant less searches, and mentions his views related to the same. It mentions a case where court ruled that police were justified in which one resident of an apartment objected while other consented to a police search. It...

  • CRIMINAL PROCEDURE--THIRD PARTY CONSENTUPHOLDING CONSENT TO SEARCH BY COTENANT OVER OBJECTION OF TENANT REMOVED FROM PREMISES. Fernandez v. California, 134 S. Ct. 1126 (2014). REYNOLDS, CYDNEY L. // Cumberland Law Review;2014, Vol. 45 Issue 1, p199 

    The article looks at the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case Fernandez v. California related to objection of tenant regarding the third-party consent upholding consent search and challenges the applicability of U.S. Supreme Court case Georgia v. Randolph. It mentions that U.S. Supreme...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics