TITLE

UNITED STATES v. JOHNSON: certiorari to the United States court of appeals for the sixth circuit

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Supreme Court Cases: The Twenty-first Century (2000 - Present);2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Law
DOC. TYPE
Legal Material
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on U.S. Supreme Court case U.S. v. Johnson, case number 98-1696, argued on December 8, 1999 and decided on March 1, 2000. Facts of the case state that the respondent had been incarcerated in federal prison for multiple drug and firearms felonies when two of his convictions were declared invalid. As a result, he had served 2.5 years in excess of prison time and was at once released, but a three-year term of supervised release was yet to be served on the remaining convictions. The respondent filed a motion to reduce his supervised release term by the amount of extra prison time he served. The District Court denied relief. The Sixth Circuit reversed, accepting the argument of the respondent that his supervised released term started not on the day he left prison, but on the day his lawful term of imprisonment expired.
ACCESSION #
19070280

 

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