TITLE

Secret proceedings of the federal convention

AUTHOR(S)
Martin, Luther
PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
Secret Proceedings of the federal convention;8/1/2017, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Primary Source Document
DOC. TYPE
Historical Material
ABSTRACT
Presents information delivered to the Maryland state legislature, relative to the proceedings of the Constitutional Convention held at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. The author as one of the delegates to the convention; List of propositions submitted in the convention; Views of the different parties on the propositions; Arguments on the propositions; Implication of the proposition.
ACCESSION #
21212491

 

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