TITLE

Three . . . Extremes (Film)

AUTHOR(S)
Rooney, David
PUB. DATE
September 2004
SOURCE
Daily Variety;9/16/2004, Vol. 284 Issue 52, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Film Review
ABSTRACT
Reviews the motion picture "Three...Extremes," directed by Fruit Chan, Park Chan-Wook, and Takashi Miike and starring Bai Ling, Lee Byung-Hun and Yuu Suzuki.
ACCESSION #
14520591

 

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