TITLE

The Aimless War

AUTHOR(S)
Klein, Joe
PUB. DATE
December 2008
SOURCE
Time International (South Pacific Edition);12/22/2008, Issue 50, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author comments on U.S. military involvement in the Afghanistan war with the statement that a surge in U.S. troop strength will not be enough to defeat al Qaeda and Taliban forces and end the war. The author explains how British troops have been unable to stop Taliban leader Mullah Omar who operates in Pakistan and the druglords funding the insurgency. The author opines that U.S. troops sent to the same areas will face the same restrictions as British troops.
ACCESSION #
35868395

 

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