TITLE

Selling Congress on Foreign Aid

PUB. DATE
April 1967
SOURCE
America;4/15/1967, Vol. 116 Issue 15, p550
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article emphasizes the need to convince the U.S. Congress that foreign aid produces results. President Lyndon Baines Johnson has included self-help criteria in the 1967 foreign aid bill which stressed that action must be the standard of the government's assistance to developing nations. It cites the need for U.S. public and representatives to realize that they must be courteous in making demands to such countries. The author commends the Agency for International Development (AID) for managing taxpayers' interest in a foreign aid scheme.
ACCESSION #
35457697

 

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