TITLE

No, the Stem Cell Debate Is Not Over

AUTHOR(S)
Fumento, Michael
PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
American Spectator;Apr2008, Vol. 41 Issue 3, p56
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's views on embryonic stem cell research and the discovery that human skin cells can be converted into "induced pluripotent stem cells" that can be used instead. He disagrees that this settles the debate over embryonic stem cell research, and discusses other options like the use of adult stem cells.
ACCESSION #
31470664

 

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