TITLE

EVERYONE ON BOARD!

PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Financial & Insurance Meetings;Sep/Oct2007, Vol. 43 Issue 5, p90
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author explains his own understanding of motivation and suggests activities that may help planners prepare for their next conferences. He says that motivation changes as a person grows, so when it comes to constructing incentive programs that appeal to both young and old, activities that are unique and exciting can motivate them. These activities include rafting, scavenger hunt, which, he says is a good basis of a great incentive trip and art class, which gives employees time to relax, unwind and think clearly.
ACCESSION #
26768324

 

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