TITLE

POINT OF VIEW: A PHOTO MAP OF GERMANY

AUTHOR(S)
Weski, Thomas
PUB. DATE
March 1991
SOURCE
Aperture;Spring91, Issue 123, p88
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author reflects on the history of photography in Germany. He cites the sacrifices made by various artists when the Nazis ruled the country in 1933. The post-war German society had to rebuild the artistic culture that was destroyed. He believes that with the reunification of the country, photography will reach a new point of independence.
ACCESSION #
26056877

 

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