TITLE

Forget Failure, Let's Avoid Catastrophe

AUTHOR(S)
Choharis, Peter Charles
PUB. DATE
November 2006
SOURCE
National Interest;Nov/Dec2006, Issue 86, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author comments on the aftermath of the war in Iraq. He says that if success in Iraq means that the war's benefits outweigh the sacrifice of the American and Iraqi people, then it is no longer possible even to conceive of success in Iraq. He claims that the challenge for U.S. policy-makers is to save Iraq in a way that will enable the U.S. to protect its regional and global security interests even as political support for the war continues to decline and its military continues to suffer.
ACCESSION #
23271162

 

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