TITLE

No contest

PUB. DATE
July 2005
SOURCE
New Scientist;7/9/2005, Vol. 187 Issue 2507, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article reports that eighty years after the infamous monkey trial, when John Scopes was tried for teaching evolution, pressure on Charles Darwin's theory is growing once again. Intelligent design uses the language of science to argue that man will never understand nature unless he takes the supernatural into account. Irreducible complexity proposes that some molecular systems, such as the one that triggers blood clotting in humans, cannot be broken down into smaller functioning units and so could not have been created by natural selection.
ACCESSION #
17658135

 

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