TITLE

Oil-for-U.N

AUTHOR(S)
Buckley Jr., William F.
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
National Review;3/14/2005, Vol. 57 Issue 4, p54
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Reflects on the United Nations oil-for-food scandal. Reference to Benon Sevan's use of influence on behalf of his friends and his failure to blow any whistle when suspect contractors were designated to oversee the oil-for-food program, a cover-up for easing the life and enhancing the fortunes of Saddam Hussein; His reception of $160,000 not from Fakhry Abdelnour but from an aunt; Difficulties in managing the $64 billion involved – the value of the oil that Iraq was permitted to sell in order to raise money to feed hungry Iraqis and to look after medical needs; Reference to the demystification of the United Nations as a vessel of incorruptibility.
ACCESSION #
16330637

 

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