TITLE

GET IT OVER WITH

PUB. DATE
June 1988
SOURCE
New Republic;6/13/88, Vol. 198 Issue 24, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Looks into the rumors of an imminent deal between the U.S. President Ronald Reagan administration and Manuel Antonio Noriega, general of Panama. Impact of delaying an arrangement that would liberate Panamanians from both Noriega and the U.S. economic stranglehold; Actions taken by the U.S. government to oust Noriega; Analysis of three options suggested by the author in dealing with the Panama issue; Choice between an unmitigated foreign policy disaster and a mitigated foreign policy disaster.
ACCESSION #
11482068

 

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