TITLE

CHAPTER 166: The Praetor Was the Keeper of the Roman Right

PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
Universal Right;2000, p143
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
Chapter 166 of Book One of "Universal Right," by Giambattista Vico, translated and edited by Giorgio Pinton and Margaret Diehl is presented. It offers information on the Roman Senate, which the keeper of the public right, and the Roman Praetor, which is the keeper of the private right. It notes that the Praetor was the officer of the right in the actus legitimi who administers the dominion to the citizens according to the right of the Quirites.
ACCESSION #
76301603

 

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