TITLE

Objetos contables e incontables

PUB. DATE
October 2007
SOURCE
Mas Helado: Palabras para Comparaciones Matematicas (More Ice Cr;2007, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
A part of the book "M�s helado: Palabras para comparaciones matem�ticas/More Ice Cream: Words for Math Comparisons," by Marcia S. Freeman is presented. It offers information on how to teach students to count using pictures. It emphasizes the different words used to describe numbers of objects and quantities of stuff.
ACCESSION #
47839303

 

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