TITLE

A Representative Model

PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
How Muscles & Bones Hold You Up: A Book About Models;2008, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
A chapter of the book "How Muscles and Bones Hold You Up: A Book About Models," by Marcia S. Freeman is presented, which describes through models the mechanism by which muscles move human bones. A model can be made to show how muscles and bones work together. The movement of bones and contraction of biceps muscle can be shown by squeezing a balloon. Photographs describing this are also presented.
ACCESSION #
34167835

 

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