TITLE

CHAPTER 3: TERRORISM: HOW VULNERABLE IS THE UNITED STATES?

AUTHOR(S)
Sloan, Stephen
PUB. DATE
May 1995
SOURCE
Terrorism: National Security Policy & the Home Front;5/1/1995, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Report
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
Chapter 3 of the book "Terrorism: National Security Policy & the Home Front" is presented. It focuses on the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism. Being the superpower its involvement in international affairs is likely to be viewed suspiciously. There has been the emergence of a wide variety of sub-national and transnational groups eager to vent their ire against the U.S. for supporting their adversaries.
ACCESSION #
20500459

 

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