TITLE

Romanow heard it all: spend more, spend less; privatize, don't privatize

AUTHOR(S)
Sibbald, Barbara; Mackay, Brad; Moulton, Donalee; Pinker, Susan; Square, David; Zettle, Susan
PUB. DATE
June 2002
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;6/25/2002, Vol. 166 Issue 13, p1703
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
biography
ABSTRACT
Discusses the outlook for privatization of the health care system in Canada. Question of how much Canada can afford to spend on health care; Public support for increased spending; Opposition to privatization from the Canadian Public Health Association and other groups; Advocacy of the National Council of Women for a dispute-resolution or -avoidance mechanism to improve federal-provincial relations.
ACCESSION #
6828349

 

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