TITLE

Mode of exercise and sex are not important for oxygen consumption during and in recovery from sprint interval training

AUTHOR(S)
Townsend, Logan K.; Couture, Katie M.; Hazell, Tom J.
PUB. DATE
December 2014
SOURCE
Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism;Dec2014, Vol. 39 Issue 12, p1388
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Most sprint interval training (SIT) research involves cycling as the mode of exercise and whether running SIT elicits a similar excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) response to cycling SIT is unknown. As running is a more whole-body-natured exercise, the potential EPOC response could be greater when using a running session compared with a cycling session. The purpose of the current study was to determine the acute effects of a running versus cycling SIT session on EPOC and whether potential sex differences exist. Sixteen healthy recreationally active individuals (8 males and 8 females) had their gas exchange measured over ∼2.5 h under 3 experimental sessions: ( i) a cycle SIT session, ( ii) a run SIT session, and ( iii) a control (CTRL; no exercise) session. Diet was controlled. During exercise, both SIT modes increased oxygen consumption (cycle: male, 1.967 ± 0.343; female, 1.739 ± 0.296 L·min−1; run: male, 2.169 ± 0.369; female, 1.791 ± 0.481 L·min−1) versus CTRL (male, 0.425 ± 0.065 L·min−1; female, 0.357 ± 0.067; P < 0.001), but not compared with each other ( P = 0.234). In the first hour postexercise, oxygen consumption was still increased following both run (male, 0.590 ± 0.065; female, 0.449 ± 0.084) and cycle SIT (male, 0.556 ± 0.069; female, 0.481 ± 0.110 L·min−1) versus CTRL and oxygen consumption was maintained through the second hour postexercise (CTRL: male, 0.410 ± 0.048; female, 0.332 ± 0.062; cycle: male, 0.430 ± 0.047; female, 0.395 ± 0.087; run: male, 0.463 ± 0.051; female, 0.374 ± 0.087 L·min−1). The total EPOC was not significantly different between modes of exercise or males and females ( P > 0.05). Our data demonstrate that the mode of exercise during SIT (cycling or running) is not important to O2 consumption and that males and females respond similarly.
ACCESSION #
99368224

 

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