TITLE

A review of ethical issues involved in fertility treatments in different religious frameworks: cases in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

AUTHOR(S)
Hemayatkhah, M.; Hemayatkhah, Z.; Jahromi Farahi, E.
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Journal of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences;1/15/2014, Vol. 11, p65
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduction: Numerous ethical questions have been raised by the rapid development of infertility treatments in recent years. These developments have been challenging, particularly in their religious contexts. The present article tends to review the ethical problems of modern fertility treatments in different religious perspectives. Materials and Methods:This paper used library resources and reviewed a number of books and articles written on the subject. A survey of relevant research websites was also used. Results:In Jewish religion and culture, family plays a central role. For Orthodox Jews, the couples' sexual intercourses are meant to end in pregnancy and the maintenance of generations. Therefore, Intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, without donation or uterine tubal repairs are favored as infertility treatment techniques in this religion. However, techniques which involve gamete and egg donations are viewed as improper. Islam regards sexual relations as a means to increase reproduction and fertility. People are encouraged to treat infertility in Islam. IVF, IUI, and embryo transfer are recognized appropriate while therapeutic techniques involving egg, gamete, or embryo donations are prohibited. Christianity has put the narrowest possible views regarding assisted reproductive technologies. It holds that human life must be respected and reproduction and fertility should not occur outside the couple's relationships; children should be strictly procreated by sexual relationships. Thus, reproductive and therapeutic measures should be used. The Christian church does not allow IUI, IVF, and also egg, gamete, and embryo donation, in addition to ZIFI and surrogacy. GIFT is he only permitted reproductive therapy in Christianity. Conclusion:Infertile people's religious beliefs are important influences on how they judge infertility and its treatment methods. Infertility may lead to spiritual crisis as well. Therefore, religious and cultural elements should be included in sychotherapeutic services given to infertile couples and considers it as an important factor.
ACCESSION #
99118855

 

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