TITLE

An Anthropological Study of Dress and Adornment Pattern Among Females of Kalash, District Chitral

AUTHOR(S)
Sheikh, Irum; Naz, Arab; Hazirullah; Khan, Waseem; Khan, Nasim
PUB. DATE
March 2014
SOURCE
Middle East Journal of Scientific Research;3/ 3/2014, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p385
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The land in the east of the Hindu-Kush range that lies between Pakistan and Afghanistan is called Kafiristan (the land of Kafirs), where the inhabitant followed their own religion and customs residing in the three valleys of Rumbour, Bomboret and Birrir. The basis of their religion is oral traditions, songs, mythical stories and the distinctive dress patterns they observe. Among the local people, still there is a constant resistance to any social change and the inhabitants are trying to maintain and preserve their indigenous cultural identity. The people of Kalash possess a very distinctive and unique cultural pattern, dress and rituals which successfully distinguish them from other tribes coexisting within the same geographical locale. This paganistic similarity is the basic reason of interest for anthropologists, historians, tourists and archeologist in the region. Kalasha rituals focused explicitly on maintaining the purity of their people and valley, against the impure surroundings. The oratory political life open repeatedly emphasize that all Kalasha are poor, all are equal in contrast to their hereditary grading characteristics of Muslims coexisting with them in their shared geographical space. The data for the current study has been taken from a PhD research survey conducted in 2008-09 from 825 households through anthropological techniques including participant observation, case studies and in-depth interviews from 115 respondents (both male and female of age 13 and above in Anish and Brun village of Bomburet Valley Kalash). The descriptive analysis of the information have been performed which is thoroughly supported with secondary information. The relational analysis thus conformed that the inhabitants of the area have a distinctive future with regard to their dress, religion, tradition and even death and funeral as well. However, changes have been observed in some of the aspect which is gradually making the local culture open to adopt a change.
ACCESSION #
97804572

 

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