TITLE

From the world's headlines

PUB. DATE
June 1997
SOURCE
Time International (South Pacific Edition);06/30/97, Issue 26, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents newspaper articles from around the world on the how the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species' decision to resume trade in ivory will benefit only the poachers. `The Daily Nation,' from Kenya; `Guardian,' from Britain; `The Sowetan,' from South Africa; `Aachener Nachrichten,' from Germany.
ACCESSION #
9707176374

 

Related Articles

  • Have I got a tusk for you! Lemonick, Michael D.; Adams, Kathleen // Time;6/30/1997, Vol. 149 Issue 26, p23 

    Reports that the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species voted in June of 1997 to let Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia sell 60 tons of ivory from elephant tusks to Japan. Fears that reopening the ivory trade would lead to increased poaching.

  • The ivory wars. Lemonick, Michael D.; Behrens, Gerd // Time International (South Pacific Edition);06/16/97, Issue 24, p64 

    Reports that officials from Namibia, Zimbabwe and Botswana have made a formal proposal to the 1997 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) seeking permission to sell about 30 tons of ivory from elephant tusks to Japan. Opposition to the proposal from conservationists;...

  • The ivory wars. Lemonick, Michael D.; Behrens, Gerd // Time;6/16/1997, Vol. 149 Issue 24, p64 

    Reports that officials from Namibia, Zimbabwe and Botswana have made a formal proposal to the 1997 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) seeking permission to sell about 30 tons of ivory from elephant tusks to Japan. Opposition to the proposal from conservationists;...

  • Ivory towers. Coombe, Juliet // Geographical (Campion Interactive Publishing);Apr2000, Vol. 72 Issue 4, p42 

    Highlights the 11th Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in Nairobi, Kenya from April 10-20, 2000. Significance of the decision of the CITES delegates concerning the elephant population in Africa; Population of elephants in the 1980s and 1990s; Disputes among African...

  • It's OK to kill elephants again.  // Natural Life;Sep/Oct97, Issue 57, p7 

    Highlights the mixed signals offered by the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) conference in Harare, Zimbabwe in June 1997. Delegates' approval of the conditional resumption of the ivory trade from Zimbabwe, Namibia and Botswana to Japan; Control and enforcement...

  • Kenya burns $3 mil. in ivory to stop its trade.  // Jet;8/7/89, Vol. 76 Issue 18, p18 

    Reports on the burning of a cache of $3 million worth of stolen ivory by Kenya's President Daniel arap Moi, who wants to stop the illegal trade of ivory elephant tusks.

  • Trade war.  // New Statesman & Society;3/6/92, Vol. 5 Issue 192, p5 

    Editorial. Questions the worldwide ban on the ivory trade. How conservationists defend the ivory trade ban as necessary to the survival of elephants; Indications that such a ban, combined with tough anti-poaching measures, is working; Critics' response that the cost of human life and poverty is...

  • The ivory stops here.  // Christian Century;1/6/93, Vol. 110 Issue 1, p12 

    Reports that a case of `retrospective scrupulosity' was how Anglican Bishop Michael Marshall described a recent US Customs decision to ban transport of his piano to Britain because of the piano's ivory keys. The customs officials told him the piano was forbidden because it violates laws...

  • Elephant economics: battle to ease ivory-trade ban. Stockman, Farah // Christian Science Monitor;4/10/2000, Vol. 92 Issue 96, p1 

    Reports that four South American countries plan to lobby for the sale of their ivory stockpiles at the United Nations Conference of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics