TITLE

Against social de(con)struction of science: Cautionary tales from the Third World

AUTHOR(S)
Nanda, Meera
PUB. DATE
March 1997
SOURCE
Monthly Review: An Independent Socialist Magazine;Mar97, Vol. 48 Issue 10, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Offers a critical look at the anti-realist and relativist views of Western science from the perspective of people's science movements in non-Western countries. Differences between present-day social constructivism and earlier theories; Implication of the social deconstruction of science for people of the Third World; Argument of contextual realism.
ACCESSION #
9703274376

 

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