TITLE

Mexican consul swayed by turtle protests

AUTHOR(S)
Steiner, Todd
PUB. DATE
March 1990
SOURCE
Earth Island Journal;Spring90, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
States that the Mexican government has agreed to sign the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in 1990 after protests by Earth Island Institute, Earth First! and other groups against the slaughter of olive ridley sea turtles in Mexico. International pressure on Mexico to end the turtle killings.
ACCESSION #
9611125306

 

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