TITLE

Impacts of different diffusion scenarios for mitigation technology options and of model representations regarding renewables intermittency on evaluations of CO emissions reductions

AUTHOR(S)
Sano, Fuminori; Akimoto, Keigo; Wada, Kenichi
PUB. DATE
April 2014
SOURCE
Climatic Change;Apr2014, Vol. 123 Issue 3/4, p665
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper evaluated the impacts of climate change mitigation technology options on CO emission reductions and the effects of model representations regarding renewable intermittency on the assessment of reduction by using a world energy systems model. First, different diffusion scenarios for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), nuclear power, and wind power and solar PV are selected from EMF27 scenarios to analyze their impacts on CO emission reductions. These technologies are important for reducing CO intensity of electricity, and the impacts of their diffusion levels on mitigation costs are significant, according to the analyses. Availability of CCS in particular, among the three kinds of technologies, has a large impact on the marginal CO abatement cost. In order to analyze effects of model representations regarding renewables intermittency, four different representations are assumed within the model. A simplistic model representation that does not take into consideration the intermittency of wind power and solar PV evaluates larger contributions of the energy sources than those evaluated by a model representation that takes intermittency into consideration. Appropriate consideration of renewables intermittency within global energy systems models will be important for realistic evaluations of climate change mitigation scenarios.
ACCESSION #
95446525

 

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