TITLE

Is seven a day the new five for fruit and veg?

AUTHOR(S)
Wilson, Clare
PUB. DATE
April 2014
SOURCE
New Scientist;4/5/2014, Vol. 221 Issue 2963, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a 2014 study in the "Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health" by Oyinlola Oyebode of University College, London in England, and colleagues that found people who ate seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables daily had a lower risk of death than those who ate one.
ACCESSION #
95441691

 

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