TITLE

These Three Kings

AUTHOR(S)
EMORD, JONATHAN W.
PUB. DATE
March 2014
SOURCE
USA Today Magazine;Mar2014, Vol. 142 Issue 2826, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents Martin Luther King Jr., Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln who have risen to national prominence in American history as they serve a great cause while delivering oratory and rhetoric so deep as to transform the hearts and minds of people worldwide. It cites Jefferson's Declaration of Independence that encapsulated the definition of a just government and Lincoln's speech whose rhetoric is so profound that it leaves an indelible impression that uplifts and transforms.
ACCESSION #
95380616

 

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