TITLE

MANAGING MERCY: AFRICAN AMERICANS, PAROLE AND PATERNALISM IN THE GEORGIA PRISON SYSTEM 1919-1945

AUTHOR(S)
Garton, Stephen
PUB. DATE
March 2003
SOURCE
Journal of Social History;Spring2003, Vol. 36 Issue 3, p675
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Explores the complex social and cultural dynamics that framed the exercise of mercy for African American prisoners. Parole's representation of a major technique for the regulation of justice; Crucial mechanism for the ethic practice of paternalism; Support on the older forms of economic organization and social relations in the 'New South.'
ACCESSION #
9408557

 

Related Articles

  • Prison: No deterrent.  // Christian Science Monitor;2/20/96, Vol. 88 Issue 58, p20 

    Ponders why there are so many African-American men in prisons in the United States. Reasons given include inner-city blacks do not fear prison; Comments from Richard Moran, sociology professor at Mount Holyoke College; Suggested solution strong families and communities.

  • Second chance to make good on potential. Persinger, Ryanne // Charlotte Post;7/14/2011, Vol. 36 Issue 44, p1B 

    The article discusses the faith-based charity Exodus Foundation's partnership with several organizations to help formerly incarcerated African-Americans and those at risk for incarceration become contributing members of society.

  • The view from within. Hunter, Horace // Essence (Essence);Jul94, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p40 

    Reflects on the situation of black men in prison. Implications that prisoners are victims of injustice in the system of society; Author's desire to find a woman who will not judge him as irrelevant just because he is a prisoner.

  • One in 18? COLLINS, CATHERINE FISHER // New York Amsterdam News;6/30/2011, Vol. 102 Issue 26, p13 

    The article probes why one out of every 18 African American women go to jail at some point in her life in the U.S.

  • Blacks are majority in U.S. prisons; number of inmates at all-time high.  // Jet;12/18/95, Vol. 89 Issue 6, p59 

    Reports that the population of prisoners in the United States from June 1994 to June 1995 has increased and is composed mostly of Afro-Americans. Imprisonment rate as highest in the world; Comparison between the number of black and white prisoners; Discrepancy as proof of bias in the justice...

  • Federal prison study reveals that black defendants still get longer sentences.  // Jet;10/28/96, Vol. 90 Issue 24, p14 

    Relates the findings of a 1996 study indicating that Afro-Americans receive longer prison sentences in the United States. The actual amount of the differences in sentences.

  • California study finds racial disparities. Clayton, Susan // Corrections Today;Apr96, Vol. 58 Issue 2, p22 

    Reports on the findings of the study conducted by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice in San Francisco, California on the level of Afro-Americans in the state's prison population. Percentage of Afro-Americans under some form of criminal justice control; Imprisonment scenario of...

  • Captive audience. McCormick, Patrick // U.S. Catholic;Jun2000, Vol. 65 Issue 6, p46 

    Comments on the implication of the showing of five American prison films in 1999 about Afro-American men who had been wrongly convicted of crimes. Two things that are striking about Hollywood's long-term love affair with escaping convicts; Statistics on the imprisonment rate in the United States.

  • ROVING CAMERA. Gilbert, James // New York Amsterdam News;06/14/2001, Vol. 92 Issue 24, p13 

    Presents readers' remarks on the death penalty and people of color in the United States. Abolition of death penalty in many countries; Percent of colored people who were wrongly convicted.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics