TITLE

A Population-Based Study of Obesity and Its Complications in Children and Adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Yu-bin Zheng; Hai-ting Guo; Xiao-fei Xie; Rui-lin Yang; Peo-kai Xie; Xue-ying Zheng; Xiao-shan Zeng; Shen-ren Chen; Li-ping Li
PUB. DATE
December 2013
SOURCE
International Medical Journal;Dec2013, Vol. 20 Issue 6, p691
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the obesity epidemic and obesity-related risk factors in children and adolescents. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study of 5662 students aged 6-18 years was conducted in Shantou, China. Blood specimens were examined for the levels of blood lipid, blood glucose, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in students at high risks for obesity-related diseases. Furthermore, matched self-assessment questionnaires were used for 972 students paired with their parents. Results: The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity was 6.39% and 2.83%, respectively, and the rate of obesity was higher in boys than in girls. Waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist-to-height ratio significantly correlated with BMI. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or any metabolic syndrome was 0.03532%. Fasting plasma glucose and 2-h postprandial glucose levels most strongly correlated with obesity, whereas HOMA-IR and blood lipid weakly correlated with obesity. Paternal and maternal body mass indices also strongly correlated with obesity. The feeding behaviour of children, eating environment, and food availability did not differ between the obese and normal-weight groups; however, based on the results of the grey relational analysis, these factors strongly correlated with childhood obesity. Moreover, feeding behaviour played a more important role in the prevalence of childhood obesity than sedentary lifestyle. Conclusions: Obesity, T2DM, and metabolic syndromes are prevalent in children and adolescents. The complex interactions between genetic predisposition, eating habits, and sedentary lifestyle are important risk factors for childhood obesity.
ACCESSION #
94062160

 

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