TITLE

North Korea's nuclear program, 2003

AUTHOR(S)
Norris, Robert S.; Kristensen, Hans M.; Handler, Joshua
PUB. DATE
March 2003
SOURCE
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists;Mar/Apr2003, Vol. 59 Issue 2, p74
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses concerns over the nuclear warfare capabilities of North Korea. Estimate of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency on the number of nuclear weapons owned by North Korea; Information on the deployment of nuclear weapons to South Korea by the U.S.; Provisions of the Agreed Framework signed by the U.S. and North Korea regarding nuclear weapons control; Background on the nuclear program of North Korea. INSETS: North Korean ballistic missiles;Approximate fissile material requirements for pure fission....
ACCESSION #
9331382

 

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