TITLE

Food for thought

AUTHOR(S)
Welsch, Roger L.
PUB. DATE
August 1992
SOURCE
Natural History;Aug92, Vol. 101 Issue 8, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Articulates the humorous assertion that scientists working in climatology have spent far too much time in front of a computer and not nearly enough time in an easy chair watching television. Contention that if these experts tuned in, they would realize that the cause of global warming is a result of the vast amounts of salsa consumed around the world.
ACCESSION #
9209142743

 

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