TITLE

HOW WE CHINESE SHOULD RELATE TO THE GLOBAL ETHIC

AUTHOR(S)
Liu, Lihua
PUB. DATE
March 2001
SOURCE
Journal of Ecumenical Studies;Spring/Summer2001, Vol. 38 Issue 2/3, p379
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on how the Chinese should relate to the global ethic. Origin of global ethic; Implications of the global ethic for the Chinese; Attitude of Chinese toward the global ethic.
ACCESSION #
9173107

 

Related Articles

  • Response to James Behuniak. Nivison, David S. // Philosophy East & West;Jan2000, Vol. 50 Issue 1, p110 

    Responds to James Behuniak's commentary on the author's essay `Xunzi on Human Nature,' which appeared in the collection `The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy'. Essay's address of the question of moral motivation by considering a `problem' found in Xunzi's philosophy;...

  • Nivison and the `Problem' in Xunzi's Ethics. Behuniak, James // Philosophy East & West;Jan2000, Vol. 50 Issue 1, p97 

    Comments on David Nivison's essay `Xunzi on Human Nature,' which appeared in the collection `The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy'. Nivison's address of the question of moral motivation by considering a `problem' he finds in Xunzi's philosophy; Tension in the Xunzi...

  • Reply to David Nivison. Behuniak, James // Philosophy East & West;Jan2000, Vol. 50 Issue 1, p116 

    Replies to David Nivison's response to the author's commentary on Nivison's essay `Xunzi on Human Nature,' which appeared in the collection `The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy'. Essay's address of the question of moral motivation by considering a `problem' found in...

  • Chinese Language Reform and Vernacular Poetry in the Early Twentieth Century. Lijun Bi // International Journal of Business & Social Science;Dec2012, Vol. 3 Issue 24, p56 

    In the early twentieth century, Chinese vernacular poetry emerged as a crucial part of Chinese intellectuals' elaborate efforts to meet the enormous challenge of combining the external imperatives of national salvation with the internal prerequisites of enlightenment. This study considers the...

  • Confucian Analects: Selected Reading (27). I-Yao Shen // Chinese American Forum;Jan1995, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p29 

    The article presents selected reading 27 of Confucian analects. It talks about the worries of Confucius such as untended moral conduct, shallow learning, inability to follow a righteous man and unable to correct a wrong doing. It also mentions Confucius' teachings namely, culture, ethics,...

  • Gen & Kun. Glowacki, Kenneth // Oriental Medicine Journal;Aug2006, Vol. 14 Issue 5, p3 

    This article describes the various trigrams that can instruct oriental medicine practitioners both personally and in their practice. If winter's trigram, Kan, represents a time of contraction, spring's trigram, Zhen and Xun, is about expansion and growth and summer's trigram, Li, is about...

  • CONFUCIAN TEXTS.  // Religion Book;2004, p139 

    The article offers information on the texts of Confucius. It notes that Confucius wrote or edited five works forming the foundation of Confucianism. These texts became known as the Wu Jing or Five Classics in the third century BCE. They include the Book of History, the Book of Poems, the Book of...

  • A Bernstein property of solutions to a class of prescribed affine mean curvature equations. James McCoy // Annals of Global Analysis & Geometry;Sep2007, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p147 

    Abstract  Let $$x: M \rightarrow A^{n+1}$$ be a locally strongly convex hypersurface, given as the graph of a locally strongly convex function x n+1 = z(x 1, ..., x n ). In this paper we prove a Bernstein property for hypersurfaces which are complete with respect to the metric...

  • Confucianism and Communication: Jen, Li, and Ubuntu. Yum, June Ock // China Media Research;Oct2007, Vol. 3 Issue 4, p15 

    The most appropriate way to understand East Asian patterns of communication is to understand the joint impact of jen (humanism) and li (propriety or etiquette). They are two of the most important Confucian principles. The essence of Confucian humanism is to treat other people with respect and...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics