TITLE

Visual identification of reptiles: part 1-chelonia

AUTHOR(S)
Pellett, Sarah; Cope, Iain
PUB. DATE
September 2013
SOURCE
Companion Animal (2053-0889);2013, Vol. 18 Issue 7, p342
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article, the first in a series on reptile identification, discusses the methods of visually identifying chelonia seen in captivity and presented to the clinician in practice.
ACCESSION #
90467760

 

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