TITLE

STRICT SCRUTINY UNDER THE EIGHTH AMENDMENT

AUTHOR(S)
FARRELL, IAN P.
PUB. DATE
July 2013
SOURCE
Florida State University Law Review;Summer2013, Vol. 40 Issue 4, p853
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the strict scrutiny standard of judicial review in relation to the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution as of July 2013, focusing on the U.S. Supreme Court (USSC) and legal protections against cruel and unusual punishment in America. The USSC's reported reliance on objective indicia is addressed, along with several capital punishment-related cases such as Miller v. Alabama and Furman v. Georgia. Contemporary social standards and sentencing practices are examined.
ACCESSION #
90364024

 

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