TITLE

Can you hear the people sing?

AUTHOR(S)
Cook, Patrick
PUB. DATE
July 1998
SOURCE
Bulletin with Newsweek;07/28/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6133, p74
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a humorous look at the policies of the Coalition government in Australia and how they have changed in 1998. Discussion of the date of the next election; Voting preferences; The goods and services tax (GST); The sale of the remaining Telstra stock among other topics.
ACCESSION #
903473

 

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