TITLE

That's Pharming

AUTHOR(S)
Eddy, David
PUB. DATE
September 2013
SOURCE
American Vegetable Grower;Sep2013, Vol. 61 Issue 9, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article argues on the health benefits of multivitamin than eating fruits and vegetables in the U.S. It mentions that taking supplement can increase the risk of several diseases such as cancer and heart disease. It also discusses the Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program (FVRx) created by Wholesome Wave in New York City to combat obesity in youth.
ACCESSION #
90240523

 

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