TITLE

CITES LOOSENS GRIP ON IVORY

AUTHOR(S)
Flatt, Emma; Amodeo, Christian
PUB. DATE
February 2003
SOURCE
Geographical (Campion Interactive Publishing);Feb2003, Vol. 75 Issue 2, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the partial lifting of the ban on ivory trading in Africa following a decision by the United Nations Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. Argument from South Africa, Botswana and Namibia; Condition governing the sale of embargoed ivory; Reaction of some groups to the decision.
ACCESSION #
8933523

 

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