TITLE

Legal Digest

AUTHOR(S)
Heflin, M. Todd
PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin;Apr2013, Vol. 82 Issue 4, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the case Michigan v. Summers which concerns the authority of police officers to detain persons during the execution of a valid search warrant. It says that lower courts agreed with the plaintiff, George Summers, and suppressed the evidence found in his residence because the seizure was unlawful. However, the Supreme Court ruled that the detention of Summers in a residence was reasonable because the search warrant was for the place where he settled.
ACCESSION #
88000319

 

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